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Class Spotlight: Aqua Strength and Stability

Fitness classes focusing on functional core strength that translates into safer, more efficient everyday function are in great demand. Indeed, our land-based Strength and Stability class' popularity has required us to add a second offering and it filled nearly as quickly as it opened.

 

This popularity led us to the formation of a Strength and Stability class that meets in the pool. This past summer the Sports Medicine Center launched Aqua Strength and Stability (clever name, isn’t it?) and it's beginning to gather up steam.

 

Knowing how beneficial this class can be to so many people, we want to introduce it to you while it still has openings. We're confident that the goals and philosophy of this class fit perfectly with what many of you are looking for in an exercise class.

 

Aqua Strength and Stability meets Fridays at 9:30am in the warm water pool. The class is taught by Shirley Dumas, one of our most popular instructors.

 

Watch Shirley in action in this brief video:

 

 

About the Aqua Strength and Stability Class

 

Since no one knows the class quite like she does, why not have Shirley describe it?

 

"Aqua Strength and Stability uses the physical properties of water to develop the skills essential for functional movement.

 

"Every gesture in water requires and encourages core stabilization, the activation of muscles that shape and support the center of the body. All class activities are intended to enhance awareness of this cornerstone of function. And because core stability and great posture work together at all times, we are mindful of the need to maintain neutral spinal alignment throughout the class.

 

"Using the fear-reducing support of water, we practice 'losing' and recovering our balance and a variety of other strategies to sharpen our balance skills and to reduce our risk for falls on land. These activities often become class favorites. it's empowering to succeed at something you may have thought was beyond your ability. Building confidence and a 'can-do' attitude for moving on land often follow such skill-building practice in the pool.

 

"Functional movement occurs in more than one plane, so we explore pathways in water that curve and turn, or that have straight lines and sharp corners, that change direction, force, levels and depth. Movement isolations have value, but my bias is toward whole-body movement. It's challenging and fun to experience movement of all kinds in stance or traveling, solo or with a buddy (and did I mention the agility and coordination skills involved here?). And if you're laughing, I know that you’re breathing!

 

"I am a huge fan of choice. In class, I ask each person to take responsibility for the frequency, intensity, and type of movement choices they make throughout the workout. And the workout is truly an individualized one, ensuring that each person leaves the pool feeling adequately challenged. To this end, and to add variety and fun, we often use many kinds of equipment.

 

"The warm water pool is a great environment for exercise activities that renew, energize, and refresh, that encourage sociability and playfulness, and that provide opportunities for discovering/recovering the pleasure of movement. Join us!"

 

Sounds great, doesn't it? I bet most of us can think of somebody (if not yourself) whom this would benefit. If you are interested in finding out more or registering for the class, please visit www.uwhealth.org/classes or call (608) 263-7936 and we’d be happy to answer your questions.

 

Winter/Spring classes start the week of January 6. Open registration starts Monday, December 9.