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Advances in Multidisciplinary Cancer Care 2015

Conference Information

Online registration has closed for this event. You may register on the day of the conference.

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Living and Dying: The Art and Science of End-of-Life Care

 

Join the UW Carbone Cancer Center on Friday, Nov. 6, 2015, at Monona Terrace in Madison, Wisconsin, for the 14th Annual Symposium: Advances in Multidisciplinary Cancer Care.

 

This conference is designed for individuals who are involved in cancer treatment and education of cancer patients and their families: oncology physicians, primary care physicians, oncology nurses, nurse practitioners, clinical research associates, health educators, social workers, psychologists, chaplains and other interested health care professionals involved in cancer care. Patients, caregivers and community members are also encouraged to attend.

 

Continuing Education Credits

The University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health designates this live activity for a maximum of 6.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

 

The University of Wisconsin-Madison, as a member of the University Continuing Education Association (UCEA), authorizes this program for 0.65 Continuing Education Units (CEUs) or 6.5 hours.

 

The University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Nursing, Continuing Education, designates this live activity for a maximum of 6.4 ANCC contact hours (7.7 Iowa contact hours).

Elements of Competence

This CME/CNE activity has been designed to change learner competence and focuses on the American Board of Medical Specialties areas of patient care and procedural skills, interpersonal and communications skills and professionalism.

Need

The Institute of Medicine released a report in 2014, Dying in America: Improving Quality and Honoring Individual Preferences Near the End of Life. According to the report, no care decisions are more profound than those near the end of life. Unfortunately, the experience of dying in the United States is often characterized by fragmented care, inadequate treatment of distressing symptoms, frequent transitions among care settings and enormous care responsibilities for families. According to this report, the current health care system of rendering more intensive services than are necessary and desired by patients, and the lack of coordination among programs increases risks to patients and creates avoidable burdens on them and their families.

Intended Audience

This activity is designed for individuals who are involved in cancer treatment and education of cancer patients and their families: oncology physicians, primary care physicians, oncology nurses, nurse practitioners, clinical research associates, health educators, social workers, psychologists, chaplains and other interested health care professionals involved in cancer care. Patients, caregivers and community members are also encouraged to attend.

Learning Objectives

This activity is designed to educate physicians, nurses and other health care providers about issues related to end-of-life care. Learning objectives for this conference include:

  • Describe the 40-year history of efforts to improve end-of-life care in the United States, with reference to law, ethics, empirical research and clinical practice
  • Identify and summarize the federal and state laws and professional guidelines applicable to requests for hastened death
  • Define family conflict and sources of conflict at the end of life
  • Recognize the current state of the law on end-of-life matters
  • Describe three practical tools to improve patient satisfaction when bad news is delivered
  • Define secondary stress and mindfulness and four different types of friends/interpersonal voices necessary to remain resilient as a caregiver
  • Gain knowledge of culturally sensitive strategies and best practices for meeting the spiritual needs of individuals diagnosed with cancer and their families
  • Identify a systematic framework from which to approach psychosocial suffering in patients and families at end of life
  • Explain the complexity of informing parents and children of a terminal prognosis
  • Recognize how talking about end-of-life wishes well in advance can help prevent unnecessary suffering
  • Recognize that communication is a skill that medical professionals can teach, learn and use for therapeutic benefit
  • Discuss how some people grieve emotionally (intuitive grievers) and others through cognitions and actions (instrumental grievers) and identify helpful tools for intuitive grievers and instrumental grievers.

Accreditation Statements

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Nursing, Continuing Education and Wisconsin Cancer Council. The University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

 

This activity has been planned and implemented using the educational design criteria of the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation through the co-providership of the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Nursing, Continuing Education and the above partners.

 

The University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Nursing, Continuing Education is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation.

 

The University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Nursing, Continuing Education is Iowa Board of Nursing provider 350.

Policy on Faculty and Sponsor Disclosure

It is the policy of the University of Wisconsin Schools of Medicine and Public Health and Nursing that the faculty, authors, planners and other persons who may influence content of this CME/CNE activity disclose all relevant financial relationships with commercial interests in order to allow CME/CNE staff to identify and resolve any potential conflicts of interest. Faculty must also disclose any planned discussion of unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or devices during their presentation(s). Detailed disclosures will be made in the activity handout materials.

 

Conference Agenda

 

Time Topic Speaker(s)
7:15-8am Registration
(Continental breakfast with exhibitors)
Sponsored by Heartland Hospice
 
8-8:05am Welcome and Introductions Noelle LoConte, MD

UW Carbone Cancer Center

 

Howard Bailey, MD

Director, UW Carbone Cancer Center

8:05-8:55am Improving Care Near the End of Life: How Can We Create the Systems We Need?

Nancy Berlinger, PhD
Research Scholar, The Hastings Center

9-9:55am Attend one of these workshops:  
  Ethical Challenges in Palliative Care: Requests for Physician-Hastened Death Tomasz Okon, MD
Palliative Care, Marshfield Clinic
  Family Conflict at End of Life: Research and Implications for Best Practices Betty J. Kramer, PhD, MSSW
Professor, UW School of Social Work
  It's Your Choice, It's Your Voice: Advance Care Planning - Reflections on the Law Kate Schilling
Legal Services Manager, Greater Wisconsin Area on Aging Resources, Elder Law & Advocacy Center
  Tips for Giving Bad News - Making the Difficult a Little Easier. An Interactive Workshop James Deming, MD
Palliative Care, Mayo Clinic Health System, Eau Claire
9:55-10:10am Break
Visit with Symposium Exhibitors
 
10:10-11:20am Remaining the Calm Within the Storm

Robert Wicks, PsyD
Professor Emeritus, Loyola University Maryland

11:25am-12:20pm Attend one of these workshops:  
 

Spiritual Needs and Practices: Perceptions of Healthcare Professionals (Panel Discussion) 

Moderator
Tracy Schroepfer, PhD, MSW, MA
Associate Professor, UW School of Social Work

 

Panelists

Fr. Patrick Norris, MDiv, MA, Priest Chaplain/Ethicist, St. Mary's Hospital

Carrie Lapham, APNP, BC-PCM, Palliative Care Nurse Practitioner, Gundersen Health System


Jonathan Gully, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Hematology-Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin

 

Our Toughest Cases: Managing Psychosocial Suffering at End of Life Without Suffering Yourself

Kerry Case, MD
Palliative Medicine, Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare

 

John Schesta, PhD
Psychologist, Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare

 

Can You Hear Me Now? Truth Telling in Pediatric Oncology 

Margo Hoover-Regan, MD
Pediatric Oncologist, UW Department of Pediatrics Hematology, Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplant

 

Joyce Kilgore-Carlin, CAPSW
Clinical Social Worker, UW Department of Pediatrics Hematology, Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplant

 

Serving the Forgotten: End-of-Life Care for the Homeless and Imprisoned (Panel Discussion)

Moderator
Melanie Ramey CEO, The HOPE of Wisconsin

 

Panelists

Andrea Wipperfurth, RN, BSN, CHPN, Director of Clinical Services-Access, Agrace HospiceCare

 

Andrew Land, RN, BSN, CHPN, Director of Hospice and Palliative Care Services, Agnesian HealthCare

12:20-1pm Lunch   
1-2:25pm Consider the Conversation: Using Film to Inspire Person Centered Care Terry Kaldhusdal and Mike Bernhagen
Consider the Conversation Producers 
2:25-3:25pm

Different Ways of Grieving, Different Ways of Healing

Doug Smith, MA, MS, MDiv
Trainer, Consultant, Author

3:25-3:35pm Synthesis of Day/Wrap Up/Evaluation Noelle LoConte, MD
UW Carbone Cancer Center