Craig T. January, MD, PhD, FACC

  • Cardiovascular Medicine
Craig T. January, MD, PhD, FACC

About

Dr. January is a clinician/scientist whose pioneering research has investigated the role of the L-type calcium channel in potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmias. He also investigates the molecular mechanisms of the congenital and acquired long QT syndromes that cause abnormalities of the heart’s electrical system to provoke cardiac arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Dr. January is a Fellow of the American College of Cardiology and member of several societies, including the American Heart Association and Wisconsin Heart Association. He has served extensively on peer review panels, including several National Institutes of Health Cardiovascular Study Sections, national American Heart Association review sections and VA merit review panels.

Languages spoken
  • English
University affiliation
  • Department of Medicine

Practice locations

  • University Hospital - Cardiovascular Medicine
    • 600 Highland Ave. / Madison, WI
    • (608) 263-1530
    • Closed now
    •  
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  • University Hospital - Inherited Arrhythmias Clinic
    • 600 Highland Ave. / Madison, WI
    • (608) 263-1530
    • Closed now
    •  
      View hours, services and more

Education & credentials

Board certifications
  • Internal Medicine
  • Cardiovascular Disease
Medical School
  • University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
Fellowships
  • University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL
Residencies
  • University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL
Internships
  • University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL

Specialties

Additional conditions and treatments
  • Cardiac Arrest Prevention Program
  • Inherited Arrhythmias

Research and publications

Dr. January’s research focuses on understanding basic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias, and he has worked extensively in drug-induced and inherited arrhythmia mechanisms. His laboratory has been instrumental in defining how mutations in cardiac ion channel genes, including the HERG potassium channel gene, lead to the congenital long QT syndrome, and on potential new therapies for this disease.