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American Family Children's Hospital

Winston J. Durant's 10-Year Plan

In the summer of 1966, Win Durant presented his 10-year plan for pharmacy services at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics.


The 10-year plan began as a vision, a vision that was created by Win Durant himself with his first resident, David Zilz. The vision began with:


"The pharmacist must assume complete responsibility for all medications, from the time of selection through the time of administration."


The vision went on to describe pharmacist responsibilities as such:

  1. View all medication orders as written by the physician.
  2. Review patient medication therapy.
  3. Prepare and identify the ultimate dosage form of the medication for administration.
  4. Ensure that the medication is administered properly (right patient, drug, dose, route, and time).
  5. Oversee selection, procurement, and storage of all medications.

As this vision evolved, Win Durant was able to set forth his 10-year plan. This plan outlined how pharmacy services would grow and what the department ought to accomplish moving forward. Win was commended by his peers for his unique ideas, but many believed that accomplishing such novel feats would be too difficult. It was this 10-year plan that catapulted the University of Wisconsin Hospital department of pharmacy into many years of innovation and prosperity.


Here are a few highlights from the 10-year plan:

  1. Design and implement a unit dose drug distribution system for all 800 inpatient beds.
  2. Implement an I.V. admixture service covering all inpatient nursing units, including all intensive care beds.
  3. Implement a decentralized clinical pharmacist service covering all inpatient nursing units from 6:30am until 11pm, seven days per week. Each pharmacist will cover 60 to 80 patients.
  4. Implement a pharmacy-coordinated technician medication administration program. Pharmacy technicians would administer all scheduled oral, rectal, subcutaneous and intramuscular medications two shifts per day, seven days per week.
  5. Implement a dedicated pharmacy minicomputer system to manage all medication orders, medication distribution, and medication administration for all inpatients.
  6. The pharmacy department will take over management for central supply, materials reprocessing, and hospital purchasing.

To this day, many of Win's innovative ideas are ingrained into hospital pharmacies nationwide.