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Resolutions

Smoking Cessation Resources
 
1-800-QUIT-NOW
 
Activity Avenue
 
Learn simple exercises that can help you improve your health.
 
 
Healthy Recipes for Life
 
Eating healthy can still mean delicious food. Here are some easy recipes for a healthful diet.
 
January, the beginning of a new year, is the time when we think about fresh starts, resolutions for a better life and starting over.
 
Some cancer patients feel this way after their diagnosis, too - cancer can be a strong motivator to make healthy changes in your life.
 
So, if you are thinking of making some resolutions for your health, and specifically in the area of cancer treatment or prevention, allow me to make a few suggestions for you to consider:

Exercise
 
Exercise is useful in preventing breast, pancreas and intestinal cancers, as well as improving quality of life and reducing fatigue for patients undergoing cancer treatment, including breast, stomach, lung, testicular, prostate and colorectal cancers, as well as leukemia and lymphoma.
 
There are also psychological benefits to cancer patients when they exercise. Cancer patients who exercise may also live longer.
 
There are helpful links in the Activity Avenue column of the Advances e-Newsletter with some easy exercises you can try. And of course before starting any exercise program, check with your physician to make sure it is safe for you.

Quit Smoking
 
Tobacco continues to be a major source of preventable illness and death amongst Americans. You probably don't need me to tell you the many reasons why quitting smoking is likely the best thing you can do for your health. But maybe you aren't sure how to quit. I refer my patients to The Wisconsin Tobacco Quit Line, at 1-800-QUIT-NOW, or www.ctri.wisc.edu/quitline. And remember, each time you try you are more likely to be successful, so don't give up.

Obtain or Maintain a Healthy Weight
 
The evidence is clear now - obesity is a risk factor for many different cancers. And continuing to be overweight or obese after a cancer diagnosis may increase your risk of the cancer returning. But if you do start exercising maybe that will help you manage your weight - a two-for-one health deal!

I know none of these are easy, but they are important. I have been on my own personal struggle to be healthy for about a year. For me, it helps to remind myself that nothing good comes without work. If you agree, why not make some resolutions for your health and why not start today?
 
About Dr. LoConte

Dr. LoConte is an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She joined the faculty of the UW Carbone Cancer Center in the summer of 2006. She was the recipient of the American Society of Clinical Oncology Young Investigator Award for 2006. Her clinical interests are in gastrointestinal cancers, as well as cancer of any type in the older adult.

Dr. LoConte writes a column for Advances e-Newsletter called A Note From Your Doctor. In her column, she shares her thoughts on healthy living, cancer research and current treatments. She will even answer your questions.