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2014 Transplant and Organ Donation Calendar: Dylan Prescott

Dylan uses his gifts as a public speaker to share his story with members of his tribe and community.In his occupation as cultural advocate and resource director of the American Indian Resource Center of Marathon County, Dylan Prescott travels to colleges, organizations and schools to promote cultural awareness and help families both on and off the Indian reservation.

 

In 2009, Dylan was diagnosed with diabetes. Although he was able to get the disease under control, his kidney function continued to decline.

 

"I was always tired," said Dylan, "and I had no appetite. I felt like a giant burden was resting on my shoulders."

 

In February of 2013, Dylan received a kidney transplant thanks to his living donor and girlfriend, Jennifer.

 

"I feel 150 percent better in mind and body," said Dylan. "From the moment I came out of surgery, the burden had been lifted from my shoulders."

 

Now Dylan feels lucky to have the ongoing support of his donor.

 

"I am lucky because I get to see my donor every day," said Dylan. "She keeps me in line, and reminds me to drink water and take care of myself."

 

Dylan feels very grateful for the support of his family and friends, including his mother, who is currently on dialysis.

 

Prior to his transplant, Dylan did not have a great awareness for organ donation. Now he uses his personal skills and gifts as a public speaker to share his story with members of his tribe and community, many who also have diabetes.

 

For generations his family has been participating in POW WOWS, and traveling across the country to participate and compete in dance presentations. Thanks to his transplant, Dylan not only has the energy to do this again, but also a new found sense of purpose – to move forward in life to share the message of organ donation and transplantation.