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Recurrent Prostate Cancer

Recurrent prostate cancer is a return of cancer that was thought to be cured or inactive (in remission). The prostate gland is a small walnut-shaped organ that lies just below a man's bladder.

Prostate cancer may return in or around the prostate. Or it may return in another part of the body, such as the bones.

If recurrent prostate cancer returns in or around the prostate, it can be diagnosed through a series of tests. These tests include a digital rectal exam (DRE), prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test, and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy.

Recurrent prostate cancer may be treated with radiation therapy, prostatectomy, or hormone therapy. Additional treatment will depend on previous treatment, location of the cancer, and other health problems the man may have. In some cases, taking part in a clinical trial of a new treatment may be an option.

Last Revised: September 12, 2012

Author: Healthwise Staff

Medical Review: E. Gregory Thompson, MD - Internal Medicine & Christopher G. Wood, MD, FACS - Urology, Oncology

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