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Wisconsin Donor Family Featured on Rose Bowl Float

For a seventh year, Donate Life America has entered a float in the Rose Parade to inspire millions of people to save and heal lives as organ, eye and tissue donors.

 

The Donate Life Rose Parade float, which is the nation's largest public celebration of organ, eye and tissue donation, is supported by approximately 120 organizations from across the nation, including organ, eye and tissue recovery organizations, hospitals, transplant centers, health care companies and transplant recipient organizations.

 

The 2010 Donate Life float, themed New Life Rises, features the mythical phoenix, a symbol of life emerging from the ashes of death that represents those who give life in their passing and the lives renewed through transplantation.

 

The 2010 Donate Life float has 24 float riders, each a transplant recipients and/or family members of a deceased donor and 76 floragraphs, which are artistic portraits created with organic materials that depict loved ones whose donations of organs, eyes and/or tissue saved and healed those in need.

 

Drawing of the Rose Bowl Parade floatKristie Neilson Corning traveled to Pasadena in early December to create a floragraph in honor of her daughter, Annie, who was a donor in 2003. While there, Kristi kept a journal and took photos to capture her experience in Pasadena, and will do so again when she returns to Pasadena to watch the parade. In January, Kristi will share her experiences and photos online, and a link to her story will be sent to Ripple Effect readers.

 

Additionally, roses that are used to decorate the float may be dedicated to individuals or programs. More than 3,000 dedicated roses will be featured in the Family Circle Garden at the front and rear of the float, each carrying a personal message of love, gratitude and hope to a donor, recipient or transplant candidate.

 

Anne Marie Reece, who is a living donor, and her husband Brian, both of whom are active volunteers with the Dottie Donor Dot program, traveled to Pasadena to assist with float decorating. They were inspired to dedicate a rose to Dottie which reads:

 

Dottie Donor Dot travels throughout Wisconsin with great enthusiasm educating citizens on the importance of, and the process for, registering to become an organ donor.

 

They also dedicated a rose to the UW Transplant team which reads:

 

For the University of Wisconsin Madison Transplant doctors, nurses and staff members, for their
dedication and devotion to enhancing the lives of their patients.