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Vertigo: Balance Exercises

Introduction

Many people experience vertigo. If you have Ménière's disease or benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), you may have to deal with vertigo throughout your life. The spinning sensation it causes puts you at risk for falling and can also affect your quality of life if it interferes with your level of activity. You can do exercises at home to help your body get used to the confusing signals that cause your vertigo. Doing these exercises may help you cope with your vertigo.

How To

Exercises can help you improve and safeguard your balance. Level 1 exercises include the Romberg exercise, standing sway exercises, and marching in place. These are "beginner" exercises. Over time you may try level 2 exercises, such as turning in place and doing head movements while standing. These are a little harder than level 1 exercises. Your vertigo symptoms may improve within a few days to a few weeks.

With each exercise, start out slowly. Over time, you can gradually try to do the exercise for a longer time or do more repetitions. When you first begin, it is important to have someone with you in case you feel you are going to fall. As you progress, you may be able to do some of the exercises on your own.

If you are concerned about falling, always have someone with you.

  • Level 2 exercises may help to improve balance for vertigo and may reduce vertigo symptoms. As you do them, start out slowly and gradually try to do the exercise for a longer time or for more repetitions.

You can track your progress for these exercises. Prepare a list that shows the date, the time you spent exercising, how often your eyes were open or closed, and how you felt during each exercise.

  • You can also do walking exercises for vertigo, which may improve your balance and symptoms of vertigo. A specific start/stop method is used to improve your balance.

You can track your progress for walking exercises. Prepare a list that shows the distance you walked, how often you walked, and how you felt while you were walking.

Credits

By Healthwise Staff
Anne C. Poinier, MD - Internal Medicine
E. Gregory Thompson, MD - Internal Medicine
Last Revised December 19, 2012

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