American Family Children's Hospital
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Advanced Practice Pharmacy Clerkships: Specialty Elective 760 Clerkships

UW Health encompasses an academic medical center, multiple specialty and primary care clinics, 14 ambulatory pharmacies, and a wide array of innovative pharmacy services. We are a pharmacy department nationally recognized in the areas of clinical pharmacy practice, pharmacy leadership and residency training.

 

Contact Information

 

David Hager, PharmD, BCPS

 

1 South Park Pharmacy

  • Location: 1 South Park St.
  • Patient population: ENT, dermatology, oncology, rheumatology and other specialty clinics
  • Student role: Extensive opportunities for medication regimen review; recommendations on additional or alternative therapies to providers; nonprescription recommendations to patients; counseling; provide immunizations
  • Unique student opportunities: Frequent drug information questions; electronic medical record (access to labs and patient charts); great relationships with clinic providers; compliance packaging; chemotherapy training
  • Typical hours: 8:30 am-5:00pm, Monday to Friday
  • Weekend flexibility: No

UW 1102 South Park Pharmacy

  • Location: 1102 S. Park St., Madison, WI  53715
  • Patient Population:
    The pharmacy at 1102 S. Park serves patients of the clinics at 1102 S. Park in the building as well as outside customers. Clinics located within the building include Access Community Health Center Wingra Family Medicine Clinic, UW Arboretum Family Medicine, UW Arboretum OB/GYN, and UW Behavioral Health and Recovery. In 2016/2017 a UW Health Pain clinic will open in the building. Each of the clinics has unique team members, work flows, and special interests. Some of these interests include but are not limited to: integrative medicine, addiction, medicine, adult mental illness, pediatric care, maternal health, behavioral health and recovery, and pain management.
  • Student role: Student pharmacists provide patient education and consultation, serve as an information resource for clinic providers, complete complex medication reviews, administer immunizations (if certified), and perform other activities expected of pharmacists on site.
  • Unique student opportunities: 
    • UW Health’s integrated relationship with Access Community Health Centers (ACHC) clinics at Wingra and Erdman clinic introduces students to Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) requirements and 340B Drug Pricing Programs
    • The intimate relationship the pharmacy staff have with the clinics in the building offers student the unique opportunity to be part of an integrated health care team.
    • UW 1102 S. Park pharmacy oversees the UW Health Remote Dispense site at ACHC Erdman Clinic. Student pharmacists learn about the benefits and potential challenges related to a remote dispense pharmacy. They will provide patient education and consolation via video conferencing with customers at the remote dispense location.
    • Student pharmacists will communicate with patients in multiple languages using video, telephone, or in person interpreters. Approximately 35-40% of the patients that use the pharmacies at 1102 S. Park and Erdman Remote Dispense site speak Spanish.
    • Access to the Electronic Medical Record allows staff to see records pertaining to labs, medication history, and patient visits, thus allowing for more comprehensive medication reviews and opportunities for interventions.
    • Unique patient population adds a complex layer to pharmaceutical care and heightens student awareness of issues such as homelessness, hunger, unemployment, domestic abuse, substance dependance/addiction, undocumented status, and adult mental illness.
    • Site pharmacists’ role in clinic operations exposes student pharmacist to processing refills under a refill delegation protocol and understanding insurance requirements for prior authorizations. Student pharmacists will work with clinic pharmacist to evaluate the potential for therapeutic interchange, necessity for prior authorization, and completion of required forms.
    • Student pharmacist may have opportunities to work with family medicine residents, integrative medicine fellows, and other providers in the clinic based on availability and interests
  • Typical hours: Pharmacy is open 9am-5:30pm (closed from 1-1:30pm), Monday to Friday
  • Weekend flexibility: No
  • Parking on site: yes (free)

Abdominal Transplant (Transplant-1/2)

  • Patient population: Kidney, liver, pancreas transplant patients (new, readmissions for complications, donors)
  • Student role: Multidisciplinary rounds (attendings, fellows, residents, medical students, midlevels, RNs, nutrition, case management) and bedside rounds with attendings (approximately two to four hours per day rounding); extensive opportunities for medication regimen review in a complex patient population; recommendations on additional or alternative therapies to providers; admission and discharge medication reconciliation and consultation; first dose teaching; therapeutic drug monitoring
  • Unique student opportunities: extensive interaction with multidisciplinary team; teach medication class for new transplant patients weekly; management of both surgical and medical patients with a broad range of medical problems; opportunity to shadow in transplant clinic; gain understanding of daily evaluation of appropriate immunosuppressant therapy; utilize a protocol to manage and dose prophylactic antiviral therapy; attend patient selection meetings; attend weekly Transplant Grand Rounds; one planned didactic discussion per week; bedside delivery of discharge medications to aid discharge counseling; opportunity to see a kidney biopsy; spend time with PGY-2 Transplant resident
  • Typical hours: 7am-4pm, 40-45 hours per week
  • Night or weekend flexibility: Limited nights available to accommodate student need; weekend flexibility to replace weekday time if patient care needs dictate and student interested.
  • Minimum rotation requirements: Desire to work with complex medication regimens, interact with patients and providers and take on additional projects to improve patient care

Adult Intensive Care (Trauma and Life Support)

  • Patient population: Diverse – mixed medical/surgical intensive care unit (liver transplant, trauma, infectious disease, pulmonary or multi-system organ failure)
  • Student role: Teaching rounds (three to four hours) with attendings and multidisciplinary team (respiratory therapy, midlevels and nutrition); extensive opportunities for medication regimen review; recommendations on additional or alternative therapies to providers; admission medication reconciliation; therapeutic drug monitoring
  • Unique student opportunities: Daily opportunity to watch procedures (intubation, line placement, ECG, chest tube, ultrasound, endoscopy, dialysis); opportunity to see advanced organ replacement systems (CVVH); experience with drug dosing in a unique patient population; dynamic environment with a rapid pace of change; approximately 10 scheduled discussions; preceptor is part of code response team for the hospital – students can shadow any code called; spend time with PGY-2 Critical Care resident
  • Typical hours: 7am-3:30pm, 40 – 45 hours per week
  • Night or weekend flexibility: No

Adult Nutritional Support

  • Patient population: Diverse mixture of medical and surgery patients requiring short- or long-term IV nutrition support (post-operative ileus, post-stem cell transplant mucositis, small bowel obstruction, fistulas)
  • Student role: Pharmacist-run consult service that manages all adult parenteral nutrition prescribed at UW Hospital and Clinics; rotation has a medical model of instruction with an attending pharmacist; student receives training and is expected to see, evaluate and make therapeutic plans on their patients independently and present them to the attending pharmacist; student will care for four to six patients on a daily basis managing macronutrients, micronutrients, insulin and fluids/electrolytes after review by attending pharmacist; protocol allows attending pharmacist to order nutrition support, fluids, electrolytes, laboratory tests, radiographic tests and calorimetry; student completes all necessary chart documentation and care-planning for their patients
  • Unique student opportunities: Daily interdisciplinary rounds with surgery teams; Twice weekly interdisciplinary rounds with trauma surgeon, dieticians, and pharmacists on nutrition support team; opportunity to go to weekly trauma and GI Grand Rounds; opportunities to see intravenous lines and feeding devices (G-tubes, J-tubes, PEGs); opportunity to shadow feeding tube placement team or wound care team; approximately four didactic topic discussions; opportunity to attend monthly various committee meetings; opportunity to spend time with pediatric nutrition support team (four hours per day rounding with multidisciplinary team of MDs, RNs, pharmacists, case management, child life specialist, respiratory therapist, dietician)
  • Typical hours: 7am-3:30pm, 40-45 hours per week
  • Night or weekend flexibility: Preceptor works every fourth weekend and can precept students during this time
  • Minimum rotation requirements: Desire to practice in a hospital setting, previous hospital rotation, willingness to take responsibility for patient outcomes

American Family Children’s Hospital Pharmacy

  • Location: American Family Children’s Hospital
  • Patient population: 25 separate pediatric specialty clinics
  • Student role: Pharmaceutical care counseling/billing, verifying appropriate pediatric dosing, compounding, verification of sterile products, recommendations on additional or alternative therapies to providers, nonprescription recommendations to patients; provide immunizations
  • Unique student opportunities: Both outpatient pharmacy services and community business; time in the Oncology Pharmacy to learn about chemotherapy treatment regimens (including monitoring, one-on-one time with patients and practitioners in regards to chemotherapy); shadowing in specialty clinics; investigational drug experience; exposure to limited distribution system medications; frequent drug information questions; electronic medical record (access to labs and patient charts); great relationships with clinic providers; sterile and non-sterile compounding (including antibiotics, chemotherapy, antiemetics and intrathecal preparations)
  • Typical hours: 9am-5pm, Monday to Friday
  • Weekend flexibility: No

Cardiac Rehab

  • Patient population: CABG, valve repairs/replacements, heart and lung transplant, ventricular assist device patients
  • Student role: Rotation is co-precepted by School of Pharmacy faculty and involves a combination of inpatient acute care and frequent visits to a cardiac rehabilitation center to do one-on-one and group medication teaching sessions; inpatient experience includes multidisciplinary rounds with physicians, PAs, NPs, RNs and social work, extensive opportunities for medication regimen review, recommendations on additional or alternative therapies to providers, admission and discharge medication reconciliation and consultation, first dose teaching, therapeutic drug monitoring
  • Unique student opportunities: Daily opportunities to manage warfarin;  opportunity to see a cardiac cath; teach transplant medication class; attend weekly MD educational conference; approximately 10 scheduled didactic discussions; preceptor is part of code response team for the hospital – students can shadow any code called
  • Typical hours: 7am-3:30pm, 40-45 hours per week based on patient care needs
  • Night or weekend flexibility: Limited nights and weekends available to accommodate student needs

Cardiovascular Surgery (CVS)

  • Patient population: CABG, valve repairs/replacements, heart and lung transplant, left ventricular assist device patients
  • Student role: Multidisciplinary rounds with physicians, midlevel providers, nurses and social workers; extensive opportunities for medication regimen review; recommendations on additional or alternative therapies to providers; admission and discharge medication reconciliation and consultation; first dose teaching; therapeutic drug monitoring
  • Unique student opportunities: Daily opportunities to manage warfarin; opportunity see a cardiac cath; teach weekly transplant medication class; attend weekly MD educational conference; approximately 10 scheduled didactic discussions; preceptor is part of code response team for the hospital; students can shadow any code called
  • Typical hours: 7am-3:30pm, 40-45 hours per week based on patient care needs
  • Night or weekend flexibility: Limited nights and weekends available

Central Pharmacy: Sterile Products Area

  • Patient population: All patients that receive medications within the UW Hospital and Clinics system, including UW Hospital and Clinics inpatients and specialty clinics. Ancillary support is provided to patients in the outpatient pharmacy and the American Family Children's Hospital
  • Student role: This rotation provides students the opportunity to apply skills learned in school to compound and verify a number of unique drug products at an academic medical center. Students will be evaluated for competency at the beginning of the rotation to be allowed to perform sterile compounding. Until verified, students will shadow pharmacists and technicians to gain an understanding of USP <797> standards, QA processes for sterile products and how hazardous medications are handled. Projects will involve the design of new compounding formulas, participation in ongoing improvement projects and medication safety initiatives.
  • Unique student opportunities: Approximately seven didactic student discussions; shadow in OR; shadow clinic technician to understand medication distribution systems; work closely with PGY-2 medication systems and operations resident; wear scrubs daily.
  • Typical hours: Flexible scheduling, eight-hour days, mostly between 6:30am and 6pm but hours are available until 11pm
  • Night or weekend flexibility: Nights and weekends are available to accommodate student needs
  • Minimum clerkship requirements: Complete 60-minute sterility testing one week prior to rotation

Critical Care Overnights

  • Patient population: Diverse – mixed medical / surgical intensive care unit (liver transplant, trauma, pulmonary or multi-system organ failure, neurosurgery, stroke, acute spinal cord injury), burn, acute coronary syndrome (myocardial infarction, unstable angina), CHF, arrhythmia patients, CABG, valve repairs/replacements, heart and lung transplant, left ventricular assist device patients
  • Student role: PM rounds (approximately one hour) with fellow, residents and multidisciplinary team (respiratory therapy, midlevels, and nutrition), extensive opportunities for medication regimen review, recommendations on additional or alternative therapies to providers, admission medication reconciliation, therapeutic drug monitoring, limited opportunities for discharge medication reconciliation and consultation
  • Unique student opportunities: Daily opportunity to watch procedures (intubation, line placement, ECG, chest tube, ultrasound, endoscopy, dialysis), opportunity to see advanced organ replacement systems (CVVH), experience with drug dosing in unique patient populations, dynamic environment with a rapid pace of change, approximately 10 scheduled discussions, preceptor is part of code response team for the hospital – students can attend, spend time with PGY-2 Critical Care resident
  • Typical hours: 9pm-7am, 7-on/7-off schedule

Digestive Health Pharmacy

  • Location: Digestive Health Center
  • Patient population: The Digestive Health Center includes gastroenterology/hepatology (Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, hepatitis, IBS) and colorectal surgery patients. Additionally includes patients undergoing endoscopy (screening and diagnostic) procedures.
  • Student role: Rotation includes clinical and operational experiences at the Digestive Health Center. Clinical activities include medication regimen review, recommending additional or alternative therapies to providers, answering drug information questions from providers, and reviewing clinical guideline compliance. Operational activities include medication use evaluation, management of pharmacy automation hardware/software, medication checking, and project involvement. Additional opportunities available for spending time in the infusion center with pharmacist, shadowing endoscopy procedures, and shadowing clinic providers. Regular topic discussions are held on GI disease states. Rotation includes experience with biologics and other specialty pharmacy medications.
  • Unique student opportunities: Unique pharmacy setting (clinic specific pharmacy) and use of electronic medical record (access to labs and patient charts)
  • Typical hours: 8am-4:30pm, eight hours per day
  • Weekend flexibility: No

Drug Policy (Center for Medication Use Policy)

  • Student role: The student participates as an integral member of the Drug Policy Program. In addition to shadowing pharmacists, the student will work on projects related to the development and implementation of drug policy (formulary monographs, guidelines, delegation protocols, drug information questions) and associated clinical tools (order sets, decision support tools). The student will also help with the facilitation of the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee meeting and various other committees (Medication Safety, Chemotherapy Council, Drug Product Selection and Supply, Anticoagulation, Antimicrobial, Smart Pump, Medication Use Evaluation).
  • Expected outcomes: Develop an understanding of the role of applied medication use policy in the health care environment; develop and demonstrate written and verbal communication skills; develop and demonstrate fundamental project management skills; develop a systematic approach for providing drug information services; gain an understanding of the role and management of a hospital formulary
  • Unique student opportunities: Assist as teaching assistant for drug literature evaluation course at the school of pharmacy; attendance at a variety of meetings as developed during a weekly calendar review
  • Typical hours: Monday through Friday, 7am to 5pm

East Clinic Specialty Mail Service Pharmacy

  • Location: East Clinic
  • Patient population: Multiple sclerosis, cystic fibrosis, transplant medicine, Crohn’s disease, Ulcerative Colitis, HIV, hepatitis C, psoriasis, pediatric complex care, rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Student role: Extensive opportunities for medication regimen review; counseling with a focus on long-term adherence/troubleshooting adverse effects; coordinating follow-up with primary physicians and caregivers; provide immunizations
  • Unique student opportunities: Combined medication management mail service pharmacy and clinic pharmacy; exposure to specialty pharmaceuticals; extensive collaboration with transplant coordinators and clinic providers; electronic medical record (access to labs and patient charts); use of pharmacy innovation (ParataMax dispensing system and shipping services); free parking
  • Typical hours: Student hours are flexible; site is open from 8am-6pm, Monday to Friday
  • Weekend flexibility: No

Emergency Department

  • Patient population: Diverse, fast-paced population including ACLS, acute coronary syndrome, stroke, trauma, DKA, infectious disease, status epilepticus, DVT/PE, asthma, migraine, toxicology and spinal cord injury
  • Student role: Intense environment in which students get involved in the emergent care of patients through extensive opportunities for medication regimen review; recommendations on additional or alternative therapies to providers; participation in code responses; alternative antibiotic therapies based on allergies; multiple opportunities to answer drug information questions; didactic learning based on cases seen in the ED during the rotation
  • Unique student opportunities: Approximately 12 pre-planned didactic discussions in addition to interesting topics as they arise in the ED; opportunity to practice preparation of medications used emergently; weekly emergency medicine conference
  • Typical hours: 1200-2030, 40 hours per week
  • Night or weekend flexibility: Nights are available to 11pm; weekends available

Emergency Medicine and Pediatric Overnights

  • Patient population: Diverse – mixed adult medical/surgical and pediatric population. These range from general care to critical care patients.
  • Student role: Completing medication histories of patients admitted from the ED or Children’s Hospital. Interaction with medical students, ED attendings, residents, nurses and social work will involve medication related questions, medication profile reviews and disease state discussions. Extensive opportunities for medication regimen review, recommendations on additional or alternative therapies to providers, admission medication reconciliation, therapeutic drug monitoring, limited opportunities for discharge medication reconciliation and consultation
  • Unique student opportunities: Daily opportunity to watch procedures (intubation, line placement, ECG, chest tube, ultrasound), experience with drug dosing in a unique patient population, dynamic environment with a rapid pace of change, scheduled discussions, preceptor is part of code response team for the hospital – students can shadow any code called.
  • Typical hours: 9pm to 7am; Monday through Thursday

General Pediatrics

  • Patient population: Diverse – neonates, infants, children, and adolescents admitted for a variety of conditions (asthma, bronchiolitis, community-acquired pneumonia, neonatal fever, ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, appendicitis, cystic fibrosis, trauma, pediatric seizure disorders)
  • Student role: Attend team rounds with medical residents, students, and attendings (two to four hours per day); admission and discharge medication reconciliation and consultation; first dose teaching; therapeutic drug monitoring; extensive opportunities for medication regimen review; recommendations on additional or alternative therapies to providers
  • Unique student opportunities: Approximately three topic scheduled didactic discussions per week set up at the beginning of the rotation; weekly attendance at Pediatric Grand Rounds if applicable to pharmacy practice; students complete one journal club and one case presentation for presentation to the pharmacy team; recommended for students interested in pursuing a future in pediatrics
  • Typical hours: 8am-4:30pm, 40-45 hours per week
  • Night or weekend flexibility: Limited nights and weekends available to accommodate student needs

Hematology/Oncology/Bone Marrow Transplant

  • Patient population: Blood cancer (lymphoma, leukemia, and multiple myeloma) patients, allogeneic or autologous bone marrow transplant (BMT) recipients, and solid tumor patients admitted for complications. Student spends time in each area based on interest.
  • Student role: During hematology: rounding with attending, fellow, residents, interns, medical students, and nurse practitioners then attending interdisciplinary rounds with physicians, nurse practitioners, nurses, case management, and nutrition (total of approximately three hours rounding per day); during bone marrow transplant: rounding with attendings, nurse practitioners, and often a fellow (total of approximately four hours rounding per day); during oncology: rounding with attendings and nurse practitioners then attending interdisciplinary rounds with physicians, nurse practitioners, nurses, case management, and nutrition (total of approximately two to three hours rounding per day); extensive opportunities for medication regimen review, recommendations on additional or alternative therapies to providers, admission and discharge medication reconciliation and consultation, first dose teaching, and therapeutic drug monitoring
  • Unique student opportunities: Students will complete a journal club, attend weekly hematology conference, attend weekly BMT conference, spend time with PGY-2 oncology residents; student projects often involve guideline development or revision; additional opportunities include: spending time with the palliative care service, working with the oncology pharmacy coordinator, observing procedures (lumbar punctures, stem cell infusions, bone marrow biopsies), shadowing in oncology clinic, and attending a Chemotherapy Council meeting, an Oncology Pharmacy Service Line meeting, a chemotherapy protocol review, and Oncology Grand Rounds
  • Typical hours: Either 7am-3:30pm or 8am-4:30pm based on rotation, 40-45 hours per week
  • Night or weekend flexibility: Limited nights and weekends available to accommodate student needs

Hospice

  • Patient population: Patients with a prognosis of six months or less with a mixture of terminal diagnoses (cancer, dementia, COPD, CHF)
  • Student role: Rounding with multidisciplinary team (MDs, social worker, RNs and grief counselor) daily, then seeing targeted patients with attending (one hour per day); extensive opportunities for medication regimen review; recommendations on additional or alternative therapies to providers; medication reconciliation on transfer to hospice; frequent drug information questions
  • Unique student opportunities: Mix of inpatient and outpatient care; opportunity to see patients in their homes with a nurse or physician; approximately 15 scheduled didactic discussions; opportunity to attend a mixture of administrative and clinical meetings with preceptor; assist with nursing orientation/teaching; excellent low-cost local food from an on-site chef
  • Typical hours: 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM, 40-45 hours per week
  • Night or weekend flexibility: No

Infectious Disease

  • Patient population: Diverse (any inpatient treated for a multitude of infectious diseases and infectious disease complications)
  • Student role: Round with ID consult team daily (three to four hours per day); team includes ID attending, fellow, residents and medical students; responsibilities include monitoring (adjusting for organ dysfunction), lab and culture follow-up, detecting Rx interactions; participate in HIV-ID clinic; present approximately one to two patient cases to preceptor daily with follow-up didactic discussion of the underlying pathology of the specific infectious disease process; present a minimum of one journal club dealing with a therapeutic controversy; perform therapeutic drug monitoring and pharmacokinetic calculations including but not limited to aminoglycosides and vancomcyin; work closely with the antimicrobial monitoring efforts and perform a review of antimicrobial use as it pertains to institutional guidelines
  • Unique student opportunities: Plate rounds weekly; weekly ID conference (one-hour patient case presentation and one-hour discussion) with ID fellows and faculty; pharmacokinetic calculations and monitoring
  • Typical hours: Generally 7am-4:30pm, 45-50 hrs per week
  • Night or weekend flexibility: Limited, but some rounding may go until late evening

Inpatient Psychiatry (Psych)

  • Patient population: Voluntary and involuntary admissions for psychiatric conditions (depression, suicidal ideation or attempt, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia); electroconvulsive therapy patients
  • Student role: Multidisciplinary rounds (one to four hours per day) where patient is present with physicians, psychologist, RNs, social work, occupational therapy; extensive opportunities for medication regimen review; recommendations on additional or alternative therapies to providers; admission and discharge medication reconciliation and consultation; first dose teaching; therapeutic drug monitoring
  • Unique student opportunities: Teach weekly medication class; opportunity to observe electroconvulsive therapy treatment; approximately eight scheduled didactic discussions; monitoring clozapine and managing clozapine registry; gain understanding of consent for inpatient psychiatry patients
  • Typical hours: 7am-3:30pm, 40-45 hours/week
  • Night or weekend flexibility: Limited nights and weekends available

Internal Medicine

  • Patient population: Diverse – multiple complex acute and chronic disease states across a wide spectrum of age (adolescents to elderly); disease states include end-stage liver disease, infectious disease, asthma/COPD exacerbations, pain, cystic fibrosis, AKI/CKD/ESRD/HD and GI (Crohn's, ulcerative colitis)
  • Student role: Attend work rounds with medical residents, students and attendings (approximately five hours per day), extensive opportunities for medication regimen review, recommendations on additional or alternative therapies to providers, admission and discharge medication reconciliation and consultation, first dose teaching, therapeutic drug monitoring
  • Unique student opportunities: Attend topic discussions with attending physicians and their medical students/residents, approximately eight scheduled didactic discussions, weekly SOAP note reviews, opportunity to shadow acute care for the elderly consult service and HIV clinic
  • Typical hours: 7am-4pm, 45–50 hours per week
  • Night or weekend flexibility: Students can work evenings/overnight with their medical teams while they are on call; limited weekends to accommodate student needs

Internal Medicine and Subspecialties

  • Patient population: Diverse – multiple complex acute and chronic disease states across a wide spectrum of age (adolescents to elderly); disease states include end-stage liver disease, infectious disease, asthma/COPD exacerbations, pain, cystic fibrosis, AKI/CKD/ESRD/HD and GI (Crohn's, ulcerative colitis). Additional subspecialty opportunities to work with HIV and advanced pulmonary diseases.
  • Student role: For 2-3 weeks students will attend inpatient work rounds with medical residents, students and attendings (approximately five hours per day). They will have extensive opportunities for medication regimen review, recommendations on additional or alternative therapies to providers, admission and discharge medication reconciliation and consultation, first dose teaching, therapeutic drug monitoring. Students will spend one day per week in HIV clinic and perform a daily review antibiotic principles: dosing, monitoring, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamic for patients. Optional additional experiences will include rounding with inpatient advanced pulmonary patients or the acute nephrology consult team. Advanced pulmonary option will include patients with lung transplants, cystic fibrosis, and end-stage lung disease. Students will attend the Pulmonary Hypertension Care team meetings and the Cystic Fibrosis Care team meetings. For acute nephrology, students will attend 2-3 weeks of daily rounding with consult service (covering AKI, CHF, hemodialysis, fluid overload, etc).
  • Unique student opportunities: Increase knowledge in HIV and see patients in HIV clinic; apply principles of PK/PD to monitoring IV antibiotics for patients on internal medicine units; review antimicrobial therapy, dosing, monitoring and guidelines for treatment of infections seen in Internal Medicine patients at UWHC: pneumonia, endocarditis, cellulitis, abdominal infections, osteomyelitis, invasive fungal infections, opportunistic infections, and HIV. Review treatment of chronic diseases and acute illness seen in internal medicine (diabetes, hypertension, heart failure, depression, kidney disease, liver disease, etc.).
  • Typical hours: 7am-4pm, 45–50 hours per week
  • Night or weekend flexibility: No

Neurosurgery/Neurology Intensive Care (Neurosurgery ICU)

  • Patient population: Head bleed (traumatic, aneurysmal, medication-related), traumatic brain injury (intracerebral pressure and neurostorming management), status epilepticus, stroke (ischemic, hemorrhagic), brain tumor, neuromuscular disorder (myasthenia gravis, Guillain-Barre, etc), central nervous system infection (meningitis, hardware infection), spinal cord injury
  • Student role: Reviewing patient medical profiles, discussing/presenting patients to pharmacist preceptor, therapeutic monitoring responsibilities, observing pertinent medical procedures occurring in ICU, obtaining admission histories, medication discharge consultations, first dose teachings, aiding F8/4 pharmacist with other clinical activities in the ICU and step down units (D6/4 and F6/4) if needed, participating in afternoon multidisciplinary rounds with neurosurgery medical residents and nurses
  • Unique student opportunities: Opportunity to watch procedures (ventriculostomy placement, intubation, participate in ACLS events), scheduled didactic discussions with clinical pharmacists as content experts, working with neurosurgeons and neurocritical care physicians
  • Typical hours: 8am-4pm Monday-Friday.   
  • Night or weekend flexibility:  Weekday evening hours are encouraged, and start/stop times are very flexible.  Limited weekend opportunities. 

Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU)

  • Patient population: Neonates (preterm and term) admitted for a variety of conditions, many requiring surgical intervention, advanced imaging, and life support
  • Student role: Attend team rounds with advanced level NPs and attendings/fellows (two to five hours per day); extensive opportunities for medication regimen review; recommendations on additional or alternative therapies to providers; admission and discharge medication reconciliation and consultation; first dose teaching; therapeutic drug monitoring
  • Unique student opportunities: Approximately three topic scheduled didactic discussions per week set up at the beginning of the rotation; weekly attendance at Pediatric Grand Rounds if applicable to pharmacy practice; students complete one journal club and one case presentation for presentation to the pharmacy team
  • Typical hours: 8am-4:30pm, 40-45 hours per week
  • Night or weekend flexibility: Limited nights and weekends available to accommodate student need

Operating Room

  • Patient population: Diverse; neonates, infants, children, adolescents and adults. All patients undergoing surgical procedures in the Main Adult Inpatient OR, Outpatient Surgical Center, Ambulatory Procedure Center, GI Procedure Center, UW adult and pediatric cath labs, Pediatric Sedation and American Family Children's Hospital OR
  • Student role: Work with OR pharmacists and participate in interdisciplinary perioperative decisions; shadow technicians in all OR areas; observe at least one procedure to understand the workflow of the anesthesia staff in relation to the surgical team and pharmacy team; assist with OR pharmacist projects; optimize pre-op antibiotic regimens following the SCIP (Surgical Care Improvement Project) guidelines
  • Unique student opportunities: Dual learning experience of the two major aspects of the operating room – clinical pharmacy and management of medication distribution within OR operations; attend weekly anesthesia Grand Rounds, and monthly Anesthesia Clinical Practice Committee; participate in the anesthesia controlled substance diversion avoidance program.
  • Typical hours: 40 hours per week; flexible, 7am-3:30pm
  • Night or weekend flexibility: no evenings or weekends available

Pediatric Complex Care

  • Patient population: Diverse – neonates, infants, children, and adolescents admitted for a variety of conditions (transplant, diabetes, neurology, spinal muscular atrophy, pediatric pulmonary disorders, palliative care)
  • Student role: Attend team rounds with medical residents, students, and attendings (two to four hours per day); admission and discharge medication reconciliation and consultation; first dose teaching; therapeutic drug monitoring; extensive opportunities for medication regimen review; recommendations on additional or alternative therapies to providers
  • Unique student opportunities: Approximately three topic scheduled didactic discussions per week set up at the beginning of the rotation; weekly attendance at Pediatric Grand Rounds if applicable to pharmacy practice; students complete one journal club and one case presentation for presentation to the pharmacy team; recommended for students interested in pursuing a future in pediatrics
  • Typical hours: 8am-4:30pm, 40-45 hours per week
  • Night or weekend flexibility: Limited nights and weekends available to accommodate student needs

Pediatric Nutritional Support

  • Patient population: Diverse mixture of pediatric medical and surgery patients requiring short- or long-term intravenous (IV) nutrition support (neonates, hematology-oncology, tracheoesophageal fistula, cardiac surgery, short bowel syndrome, ileus, small bowel obstruction, trauma)
  • Student role: Pharmacist-run, multidisciplinary consult service that manages all parental nutrition prescribed at the American Family Childrens Hospital at UW Hospital and Clinics; rotation has a medical model of instruction with an "attending" pharmacist; student receives training and is expected to see, evaluate and make therapeutic plans on their patients independently and present them to the attending pharmacist; student will care for one to six patients on a daily basis (depending on the student’s level of comfort and complexity of the patients),  managing macronutrients, micronutrients, insulin, and fluids/electrolytes after review by pharmacist; protocol allows attending pharmacist to order nutrition support, fluids, electrolytes, laboratory tests, radiographic tests and indirect calorimetry; student completes all necessary chart documentation and care planning for their patients in consultation with the Pediatric Nutrition Support Team and the patient’s primary team (and other consultants, if applicable)
  • Unique student opportunities: Daily interdisciplinary rounds with pediatric surgeon or pediatric gastroenterologist (as available), dietitians, and pharmacists on nutrition support team; daily interdisciplinary rounds with Critical Care, Hematology-Oncology, Neonatal and/or Pediatric General Care teams; opportunity to go to Grand Rounds; opportunity to observe PICC placement, feeding tube placement, or wound care team; didactic topic discussions (at least twice weekly); opportunity to attend monthly nutrition committee meeting; opportunity to shadow in sterile products area; opportunity to spend time with Surgical Nutrition Support Team
  • Typical hours: 7 or 8am-3:30 or 4pm, 40 to 45 hours per week
  • Night or weekend flexibility: No nights, possible weekends if desired
  • Minimum rotation requirements: Desire to practice in a hospital setting, willingness to take responsibility for patient outcomes

Pediatric Oncology

  • Patient population: Diverse – infants, children, and adolescents admitted for a variety of pediatric malignancies; students will also see patients after bone marrow transplant and with sickle cell disease; some exposure to neurology/neurosurgery, ENT and plastic surgery patients
  • Student role: Attend team rounds with medical residents, students and attendings/fellows (two to four hours per day); extensive opportunities for medication regimen review; recommendations on additional or alternative therapies to providers; admission and discharge medication reconciliation and consultation; first dose teaching; therapeutic drug monitoring and many questions to answer
  • Unique student opportunities: Approximately three topic scheduled didactic discussions per week set up at the beginning of the rotation; weekly attendance at Pediatric Grand Rounds if applicable to pharmacy practice and Tumor board meetings; students complete one journal club and one case presentation for presentation to the pharmacy team or to the oncology service line; recommended for students interested in pursuing a future in pediatrics
  • Typical hours: 8:30am-5:00pm
  • Night or weekend flexibility: Limited nights and weekends available to accommodate student needs

Pharmacy Informatics

  • Location: ITS Building 8007 Excelsior Drive, Madison
  • Patient population: Students will be exposed to medication management using an electronic medical record (EMR) across a diverse clinical population.
  • Student role:
    • Become familiar with information systems and informatics principles
    • Attend meetings with UW Hospital and Clinics Information Technology Services and Pharmacy Department
    • Participate in a medication safety or informatics related initiative with a multidisciplinary team as the opportunities arise
    • Understanding the principles of maintaining a pharmacy system safely
    • Oversight and review of the benefits for technology used to improve the safety of the medication use process
  • Unique student opportunities: Exposure to the field of pharmacy and health care informatics, and the potential career opportunities available in the rapidly changing and expanding field of pharmacy practice. Establish a knowledge base of computerized provider order entry (CPOE) and other areas of integrated health care technology. Gain an understanding of how legal, regulatory, and professional standards are integrated into an EMR.
  • Typical hours/night or weekend flexibility: 8am-5pm, Monday-Friday (no weekends or holidays) with some flexibility
  • Minimum rotation requirements: Completion of a 740 rotation at UW Health 

Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU)

  • Patient population: Diverse – neonates, infants, children, and adolescents admitted for a variety of conditions (DKA, congenital heart defects post-surgical correction, ECMO,  shock/sepsis, status asthmaticus, status epilepticus, and trauma)
  • Student role: Attend team rounds with medical residents, students and attendings/fellows (two to five hours per day); extensive opportunities for medication regimen review; recommendations on additional or alternative therapies to providers; admission and discharge medication reconciliation and consultation; first dose teaching; therapeutic drug monitoring
  • Unique student opportunities: Approximately three topic scheduled didactic discussions per week set up at the beginning of the rotation; weekly attendance at Pediatric Grand Rounds if applicable to pharmacy practice; students complete one journal club and one case presentation for presentation to the pharmacy team; recommended for students interested in pursuing a future in pediatrics
  • Typical hours: 7am-3:30pm, 40-45 hours per week
  • Night or weekend flexibility: Limited nights and weekends available to accommodate student needs

Radiopharmacy

  • Site description: Radiopharmacy settings providing compounded radiopharmaceuticals for use in diagnostic and therapeutic applications and in support of UW Hospital, UW School of Medicine, Carbone Cancer Center and research projects,  as well as out-of-hospital nuclear programs; an average of 50-70 doses/day are compounded.  One pharmacy concentrates on SPECT radiopharmaceuticals in a hospital setting, while the other pharmacy is located in a cGMP manufacturing environment (in compliance with cGMP Part <212>) in WIMR building.
  • Student role: Combines project-based activities and active participation in pharmacy operations including radiopharmaceutical quality control, compounding and dose dispensing, and receiving material.  Projects typically include coordinating nuclear medicine research protocols, regulatory research, Standard Operating Procedure organization or other clinically related projects; meeting attendance with the nuclear pharmacy coordinator provides exposure to current issues surrounding the use of radiopharmaceuticals, radiation safety and drug development.  Meetings include Campus Radiation Safety Meetings,, UW Radiopharmaceutical Production Taskforce, UW Radioactive Drug Research Committee, Human Radiation Use Committee, and other ad hoc task forces as they arise.
  • Unique student opportunities: Observe the application of diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals in patient care; participate in weekly journal clubs with nuclear medicine physician residents (yes, you will present); optional visits to other Nuclear Pharmacy practice areas, attend weekly nuclear medicine/radiology lectures with nuclear medicine physician residents; gain competence in the basic mathematics of nuclear pharmacy including radioactive decay calculations, concentration and dose/volume calculations, and pediatric dose adjustment calculations; gain an understanding of radiation and its biological effects.
  • Typical hours: 6:30am-3:30pm, 40-45 hours per week
  • Night or weekend flexibility: None
  • Minimum requirements: Must have completed Medical Imaging for Pharmacists 611 and Radiopharmaceuticals 612

Specialty Surgery (Gynecology/Oncology)

  • Patient population: Breast cancer, ovarian cancer, uterine cancer, head and neck cancer, prostate cancer, bladder cancer; any patients presenting with an acute or chronic symptomatology/pathology requiring procedures to meet the specialties of gynecology/oncology, otolaryngology, urology, and plastic surgery
  • Student role: Participate in daily rounds with gynecology (oncology) team; complete a daily review of assigned patients (problem list, pharmacotherapy, procedures, labs, vitals, enteral/parenteral access); monitor medications daily for indication, dosing, efficacy, safety/adverse effects, potential drug interactions, drug administration/compliance issues, procurement/cost considerations; communicate therapeutic recommendations to the prescriber; demonstrate ability to complete thorough admission medication histories; admission and discharge medication reconciliation; discharge patient counseling for specialty surgery patients; coordinate efforts with social workers, discharge planners, home care agencies, pharmacies, clinics to ensure successful outpatient drug therapy and continuity of care; provide first dose counseling
  • Unique student opportunities: Interact with the interdisciplinary team (including physicians, nurses, therapists, social worker and nurse case manager) several times per day; shadow experiences are available by request: pain team, diabetes management, surgical nutrition (TPN team) and discharge medication specialist
  • Typical hours/night or weekend flexibility: 7am-3:30pm, with opportunities to pick up hours in the evening and/or weekends. Minimum of 40 hours per week is expected.
  • Minimum rotation requirements: Pharmacotherapy pearl presented to clinical rounding service; project presentation at pharmacist team meeting. 

The American Center: Orthopedics/Hospital Medicine/Bariatric Surgery/Emergency Dept.

  • Patient population: Diverse - medicine, orthopedic surgery and bariatric surgery patients
  • Student role: This rotation provides students the opportunity to apply skills learned in school to perform medication reconciliation, vaccine screening, discharge counseling, therapeutic drug monitoring, medication histories and participation is interdisciplinary rounds. Student will also have the opportunity to watch procedures, attend codes, answer drug information questions and provide a nursing or pharmacy inservice.
  • Unique student opportunities: very diverse patient population, opportunity to attend daily rounds, frequent opportunities to manage warfarin, opportunities to dose antibiotics, free parking and on the bus line
  • Typical hours: Monday- Friday 7am-3:30 pm, 40-45 hours per week
  • Night or weekend flexibility: yes, but rounds occur Monday-Friday at 9:15 am

Trauma Surgery

  • Patient population: General care and intermediate care (IMC) of trauma and orthopedic patients with the following possible complications or conditions from trauma: long bone and pelvis fractures, rib fractures, post-concussive nausea and vomiting; pain control management (with opioids, epidurals, NSAIDS, acetaminophen, and ketamine); delirium; ethanol and/or other substance withdrawal; trauma induced seizures; trauma induced bowel or abdominal injuries; trauma induced hypercoagulable states
  • Student role: Actively participate in resident work rounds at 0600 and attending/teaching rounds; complete a daily review of assigned patients (problem list, pharmacotherapy, procedures, labs, vitals, enteral/parenteral access); monitor medications daily for indication, dosing, efficacy, safety/adverse effects, potential drug interactions, drug administration/compliance issues, procurement/cost considerations; communicate therapeutic recommendations to the prescriber; demonstrate ability to complete thorough admission medication histories; admission and discharge medication reconciliation; discharge patient counseling for trauma and orthopedic patients; coordinate efforts with social workers, discharge planners, home care agencies, pharmacies and clinics to ensure successful outpatient drug therapy and continuity of care; and provide first dose counseling
  • Unique student opportunities: Care of IMC (step down from ICU) patients; interaction with the interdisciplinary team (including physicians, nurses, therapists, social worker, and nurse case manager) several times per day; daily rounds with the pharmacist; topic discussions pertaining to patient case load; weekly trauma case conference; by request and availability: journal club with the interdisciplinary team and a one-week trade with ED APPE student on rotation; by request: Diabetes Management Service, Surgical Nutrition (TPN team), and Discharge Medication Specialist
  • Typical hours/night or weekend flexibility: 6am-3:30pm (approximately 45 hours per week based on patient care needs), with opportunities to pick up hours in the evening and/or weekends
  • Minimum rotation requirements: Assigned curriculum pertaining to trauma patients and as assigned by the School of Pharmacy or preceptor 

Unity Health – Pharmacy Benefit Management/Managed Care

  • Student role: This is primarily a project-based rotation where students gain experience and understanding of managed care and pharmacy benefit management concepts. Students will attend a variety of meetings with the Manager of Unity’s pharmacy services program whom oversees all managed care and PBM services and contracts as well as the UW Health Clinic Administered Medication Policy Committee.
  • Expected outcomes: The student will obtain a thorough working knowledge of the concepts and processes behind managing a pharmacy benefit for a managed care organization.
  • Unique student opportunities: Unique opportunity to participate in an area of pharmacy practice not open to many students; significant number of one-on-one discussions with preceptor and clinical staff
  • Typical hours: Monday through Friday, eight hours per day, business hours

UW Health Specialty Pharmacy

  • Location: 8501 Excelsior Drive and UW Health East Clinic
  • Patient population: Specialty (transplant, RA, GI, Derm, Neurology, Pulmonology, etc)
  • Student role: The student will play a role in the review of specialty pharmacy payment structure and working with pharmacists on the development of educational materials and counseling of specialty patients. Students will have opportunities to participate in WPQC interventions, vaccinations, contract review, documentation and billing for pharmaceutical care, and gain a comprehensive understanding of pharmacy reimbursement/drug procurement procedures.
  • Unique student opportunities: Electronic medical record (access to labs and patient charts); frequent drug information questions; frequent interactions with doctors, nurses and residents; contract and payment reviews; meetings with pharmaceutical manufacturers and handling of limited distribution pharmaceuticals; exposure to Epic-based patient case management and patient reporting.
  • Typical hours: 8am-4:30pm, Monday to Friday
  • Weekend flexibility: Yes